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20110701
20110731
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the cia gets caught up in this big debate about how to interrogate what to do. >> they say it's tough. anytime they operate outside of iraq and afghanistan in battlefields it becomes murkier. they say they're faced with the question of can he go back to the u.s. and be tried? that has to go through several agencies. can he have a third-party that take him when neither of the two are available, they would be forced to let someone go. >> the obama administration's treatment of the somali terrorist suspect isn't sitting well with lawmakers on capitol hill. among them lindsey graham of south carolina. >> we learned this morning that a gentleman was taken into custody, kept on a u.s. ship and he's now in custody. >> the last thing i'm worried about is prosecuting enemy fighters. i want to find out what they know about the enemy, what intelligence value do they have to the united states. having people on ships has never been used in warfare before in terms of prisons. he should have been sent to guantanamo bay and held as an enemy combatant and interrogated. >> the administration would make
to engage in serious negotiations. >> so, now what is the big question? speaker boehner will rebut the president just about 14 minutes from now. we'll take you there live. in his letter to his colleagues, he said his preference now is to work on a plan in the congress. but the president expects the house and the senate leaders of both parties at the white house saturday morning. is this just theater before a deal or a recipe for gridlock and maybe an economy shattering government default? chief white house correspondent jessi jessica yellin, and kate bolduan, and gloria borger here, jess, the speaker doesn't want to negotiate anymore, and this is not a president known for his anger or his temper, but he seemed pretty piqued. >> reporter: this was the president hitting by far his most frustrated, fed-up note during the debt negotiations by far, john. we heard him say that the republicans just don't know how to say yes. that he offered the most generous package he could. in short he said that he offered them a deal that democrats just didn't like. he was basically saying he was enrag
just another decision to push big problems down the road? let's begin there with fareed zakaria. you would think the possibility that the united states would default on its obligations for the first time in history you would think would bring a grown-up conversation to washington, it would be that. but? >> it's truly bizarre, john, because what it seems that republicans are not focussing on is the fact that were the united states to default, were there to be a danger it would default, america's interests costs would go up dramatically. if we were to, say, have a 1% rise in our borrowing costs, that markets got scared that we were not going to make good on our payments and our borrowing costs went up 1%, that's $150 billion more that we have to spend every year on our interest payments on our debt. and this is very important. if we do this for a week or two and still resolve things once markets get scared, it takes a long time for those interest rates to come down. just look at any case in history where there has been a default. once you have a crisis, even if you settle your book, yo
house republicans. but there's a big problem. neither of those plans may be able to get through congress and the clock is ticking. cnn congressional correspondent kate boulwan joins us now. let's start in the house where speaker john boehner has laid out his version of the republican solution. spell it out for us. >> reporter: a lot of details to it, jessica, but what it really comes down to is the length of the increase, if you will. house speaker john boehner is calling for two votes in order to raise the debt ceiling. first, a vote that would come with $1.2 trillion in spending cuts to get the country through early next year and another vote would be required that would get the to 2013. but only if, and this is the important part, if congress would approve the spending cuts attached to that, or the deficit reduction measures attached to that that would come from a newly created committee, and that of course is the big hangup with democrats. they are very much opposed to having to vote for a second time to raise the debt ceiling. they say it risks us returning to exactly where we are t
. hi honey! ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com >>> no progress reported tonight on the big deficit reduction talks at the white house. with that, this warning tonight from moody's investor service. the federal government could lose its top of the line credit rating if the white house and congress can't agree on a plan to increase the nation's debt ceiling, meaning allow washington to borrow more money to help pay its bills. that warning came just a few hours after this sober math lesson from the fed chairman ben bernanke. since the government borrows 40 cents of every dollar it spends, a fall you'ilure to increase washington's credit limit would require a 40% cutback in spending. >> significant cuts in social security, medicare, military pay, or some combination of those in order to avoid borrowing more money. >> now that sounds ominous, but some conservatives think the catastrophe scenarios are exaggerated. >> if congress fails to raise the debt ceiling by $2.5 trillion, that somehow the united states will go into default, and we will lose the full faith and credit of the united s
has to go that, would have a big devastating impact on assad. there is a sense in washington that not only is assad not going to reform, but the opposition is toughening up. yes, it's not united, but is persistent as every friday. soon not far away in august comes ramadan. during ramadan in august, every day is a friday. >> i realize these sort of repeated warnings from the u.s. give heart to the protestors, send signals to our allies in the region. i wonder if there is any down side to repeated warnings that don't have an "or else" to them. >> that is an interesting question. my sense of what's been reported out of the state department, they are reluctant to get specific to say assad must go because they do not think they have the capacity to get him out of there. they don't want the united states looking like a paper tiger with regard to syria. we had enough problems trying to get gadhafi to go. right now i think the united states is in a waiting game, trying to toughen sanctions, harden up the rhetoric, seeing if others will join and recognizing these protestors are not go
't be a big deal. i'll give you a few seconds to look them in the eye and say, you're wrong. >> yeah, i think you're wrong. now, of course, i don't know for sure. this is unprecedented but there is a $23 billion social security payment due on august 3rd that is not at all clear that there will be enough cash in the treasury to make that payment. so i think david is right. why would you want to take that chance? tp doesn't make sense. not for the social security recipients or for the economy or entire global financial system. >> david walker, the president meets with speaker boehner over the weekend and they are clearly not making any tangible progress. the house will go forward this week and senate will most likely vote on a balanced budget amendment and some other things that simply, to be honest, can't pass or even if they did pass the president would veto. they will move to the mcconnell plan and convince the republicans that they have your vote. do those votes undermine confidence in the market in a deal that might be reached? >> well, i think the markets know that those are not going to
. the big question is and the most important question is what does he want to do? if and when, again, he walks out a free man out of court here in manhattan the next few days, will he want to come back into french politics? and if he does, in what position would that be? will he choose to run for president or will he choose to be kind of the elder statesman if you like in french politics? and that first as an adviser to whoever would be the socialist candidate and then perhaps become prime minister of something. as you see, what is interesting about these polls and has been few of them, two or three, is that french people are very ambivalent about it, about half of them wish him to come back. half of them are not so sure about it. >> right. they're split down the middle pretty much. but let me ask you about this other woman. why -- i'm sure people who haven't followed this case as closely as some of us have, why is she coming out now? some people might think this is opportunistic because she didn't speak out at the time the alleged attempted rape took place in '03. >> it is a very comple
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)